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The 26th Man
In a game played by the rules, one man plays by his own

Film Producer, Julie Campbell, is crazy about sports – especially baseball. Originally, she set out with her Director, Peter CB Masterson, to make a film about a fictitious minor league baseball manager with Ed Nottle as a technical consultant.
 


Ed Nottle & Bill Murray
 

Once she became acquainted with Ed’s colorful background, including an up and down, five-decade career in baseball’s minor and major leagues and his single-minded interest in singing (he even released a record under his own label, Nott’s Landing), his life story became much more compelling than any fiction. As she learned more about Ed’s storied life, a common theme centered on the phrase “you cannot make this stuff up”

The 26th Man is a compelling, character-driven story, based on the life of Singing Ed Nottle, a career minor league baseball manager who never quite makes to the major leagues. Ed’s life is one of dreams, disappointment, perseverance, passion, family and humor personified in his experience of “just falling short”. Baseball as a backdrop is uniquely American, while Ed is uniquely flawed and selfish, but immensely likable. He has been in professional baseball for over 45 years as a pitcher, a manager and an owner. He has struck out Lee Mayes, Eddie Matthews and Hank Aaron in succession. He sang Frank Sinatra’s “Fly Me to the Moon” while Billy Martin engaged in one of his bar room fisticuffs, and coached over 90 players who eventually made it to the Major Leagues. During his five decades of involvement in” America’s favorite pastime”, Ed Nottle has seen and done it all.

MCP would like to thank the corporate sponsors who support The 26th Man, and the wonderful letters of support to Ed Nottle and this film project. (see below)

Known as the 'Singing Manager' Ed Nottle has been in professional baseball for 50 years, and is still managing today. Ed started out as a pitcher, then onto coaching and has been a manager for over thirty years.

About Ed Nottle

Ed Nottle is in his fifth decade of professional baseball and is the manager for the new team the Ottawa Rapidz in the CAN-AM Leagues. He was the first manager of the Brockton Rox and the only manager in his four years there to lead the team to the Northeast Championship in 2003.

During his time with the Rox he sent six players (Brooks Kieschnick, Chris Cosbey, Darren Blakely, Conor Brooks, Tony Stutz, and Nestor Smith) and two members of his coaching staff (Rich Sauveur and John Duffy) to major league organizations.

In 1985, Nottle managed the Red Sox AA affiliate, the New Britain Red Sox, and in 1986, was appointed manager for the AAA affiliate, the Pawtucket Red Sox. In 1987, he was named International League Manager of the Year. In five seasons with the Pawtucket Red Sox, Nottle sent 34 players – more than any other minor league manager during that span – to the parent club the Boston Red Sox. He lost out to Joe Morgan in 1988 in his bid to manage the Boston Red Sox.

Nottle also managed teams in Bend (Ore.), Waterbury (Conn.), Tacoma (Wash.), Sioux City (Iowa), and Duluth-Superior (Minn.) amassing more than 1,150 wins as a minor league manager and being named Manager of the Year six times at various levels of baseball.

Later in his career Nottle turned down a number of major league coaching jobs, stubbornly insisting on managing instead. This mind-set kept him out of organized baseball from 1991-92. He resurfaced in the Independent Northern League in 1993; where he has been immensely accessible and popular figure, generously donating his time to speak at charity events and schools. He is still adamant about managing rather than coaching.

Known as the “Singing Manager,” Nottle also produced and recorded an album with the Oakland Symphony Orchestra (on his Nott’s Landing label) in 1983, when he was a coach with the Oakland A’s. Titled To Baseball with Love, the album features his versions of songs such as New York, New York and Welcome to My World. The album cost Ed his house to produce, to which he responded, “Big deal, everybody’s got a house.”

Letters to Ed

  “A movie depicting the Life of Ed Nottle will no doubt be a 'HIT'. He is one of the most charismatic entertaining Baseball Character in Baseball History– A lovable guy with a passion for the game. How many mangers can laugh and sing through difficult times? Ed brings joy to everyone around him. He’s a winner in Life!”

Roland Hemond
Vice President,
Chicago White Sox

  Dear Ed,
“First the Black Sox scandal… then Sammy corks his bat… And now a move about Ed Nottle! What the heck is happening to the game of baseball???
Congratulations Eddie! Well deserved. No one loves the game more than you, and now we can all celebrate your life in the game together”

Your Friend,
George Grand
Broadcaster
Cincinnati Reds

 


Inducted 1991

  FERGUSON A. JENKINS

Dear Ed,
Congratulations on your movie project! It was Great Playing for you in the Senior League. You had an outstanding managing career in The Minor Leagues! I hope that the future holds even more outstanding things for you…

Your Friend,

Hall of Famer, Ferguson Jenkins
Fergie

P.S. Don’t lose that Singing Voice!
 

  “Ed Nottle is a baseball troubadour. His love for the game is out there for all to see, sometimes in song, always in a smile.

I first had the pleasure of meeting Ed in 1979 while he was managing in Waterbury, CT and I was a young reporter for the local radio station, Nottle’s tale is one best suited for the BIG SCREEN, to bring his story forward is to shed the light on baseball the it is meant to be!

Nottle’s accolades only begin to tell the story of a manager I was pulling for to get the reigns of a team 30 miles of Brockton in the late 80’s.”

Chris Berman
Sports Reporter
ESPN

 

News Archives

Nottle Returns to X's Helm
1/6/2006
Sioux City Journal

Five years and three managers later, the shoes no one ever seem to fill have been donned again by the guy who was such a tough act to follow. Ed Nottle, field manager of the Sioux City Explorers for the club’s first eight seasons, is back at the X’s helm, hoping to put a championship team on the field and more fans in the seats.

Nottle Puts Sioux City back in Film
1/4/2006
Sioux City Journal

On various occasions, in the company of friends who recognize the irony, Ed Nottle will make light of his limited formal education. After visiting a college campus, he once remarked, “If I’d  known college was going to be this much fun, I’d have gone to high school!” Self-deprecating humor is what it’s called. And, you can’t use it as effectively as Nottle does without a total fix on both your shortcomings and the redeeming qualities that make them almost incidental.

Return to X-cellence?
1/4/2006
Sioux City Journal

On various occasions, in the company of friends who recognize the irony, Ed Nottle will make light of his limited formal education. After visiting a college campus, he once remarked, “If I’d  known college was going to be this much fun, I’d have gone to high school!” Self-deprecating humor is what it’s called. And, you can’t use it as effectively as Nottle does without a total fix on
both your shortcomings and the redeeming qualities that make them almost incidental.

Manager's life coming to big screen
8/6/2003
Boston Globe
By JOANNA MASSEY, Globe Staff

Julie Campbell realizes that a movie about baseball is not exactly groundbreaking territory. But the Hull-based independent feature film producer says she believes there is one aspect of the game that has never been explored compellingly on screen -- the life of a minor league coach.

More Info

Baseball lifer to hit big screen; Hull producer eyes life of Rox skipper
7/3/2003
The Patriot Ledger
By MIKE Loftus

BROCKTON - Julie Campbell recently bought something she'll probably never be able to use up completely, and she thinks she got a great deal.

More Info

Technical Adviser on his Life
5/19/2004
The Boston Globe

Baseball veteran "Singing" Ed Nottle, manager of the Brockton Rox, was hired last year as a consultant by Boston-based producer Julie Campbell for a film about a minor-league baseball manager.

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Rox skipper makes his pitch for Murray
5/28/2004
The Boston Globe
By Gayle Fee and Laura Raposa

It's not that he's sucking up to the boss or anything, but "Singing" Ed Nottle, manager of the minor-league Brockton Rox baseball team, knows who he wants to play him in the big-screen version of his life: Academy Award-nominee - and Rox part-owner - Bill Murray.

More Info

Rox Skipper Manages to Score Movie Deal
5/28/2004
The Boston Globe
By Carol Beggy & Mark Shanahan

Singing his praises initially, "Singing" Ed Nottle was only supposed to consult on the shoot, but when the makers of a movie about a minor-league baseball manager got a load of the Brockton Rox skipper, he became the story. Nottle talked about the prospect of seeing his name up in lights before his team's season opener yesterday.

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Film Producer Saw Plenty in Opener
5/28/2004
The Patriot Ledger
By Mike Loftus

No wonder film producer Julie Campbell is anxious for the completion of the screenplay she commissioned for an Ed Nottle biopic.

More Info

 

The screenplay for The 26th Man is currently being sent to major studios and productions companies for consideration. If interested in receiving the films query letter, synopsis and or a copy of the screenplay contact:

Julie Campbell Executive Producer,
Mark Campbell Productions

Call
(781)773-1171 or email mcpfilms@aol.com